Showing 19 results

Authority record
Nova Scotia

Abbass Studios Ltd.

  • Abbass
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-Present

The Abbass family emigrated from Lebanon to Cape Breton at the turn of the 20th century. With his wife, Lilly Khattar, Jobe Abbass built a home on Townsend Street in Sydney, N.S. and together raised twelve children. It is in this building that three of those children, George, John and Anthony started Abbass Studios in the summer of 1946.

While still in high school at Sydney Academy, George took a job as an apprentice at Meyer’s Photography, a national chain. In 1941, after graduating from high school, his brother John also secured a job with Meyers where they both learned the craft of photography. Eventually they began private work contracting jobs with the Post Record and Chronicle Herald newspapers. In January of 1943 four of the Abbass boys, George, John, Joe and Ferris, enlisted to serve during World War II. They left their younger brother Anthony (Tony), who was too young to enlist, in charge of their Post and Herald contracts. When the brothers returned from war, they received a stipend from the government to open their own business.

Abbass Studios opened its doors July 18, 1946 in the family home on Townsend Street in Sydney, N.S. . The studio offered photo finishing, portraits and commercial photography. By the mid-1960s Abbass Studio served all of the Maritime Provinces. The company built a photo finishing plant in Moncton, New Brunswick and purchased stores in New Castle, New Brunswick. The brothers eventually brought the Econo-Color Camera Stores and Studios franchise from Sherman Hines.

Abbass Studios captured and continues to document the diverse economic, political and cultural heritage of the area. The business is still in family hands and run by John’s sons Blaise and John. The Townsend Street building was demolished in 2014 and Blaise Abbass now operates Abbass Studios, Sydney from his home. John Abbass runs the store at Scotia Square Mall in Halifax.

Bell, Alexander Graham

  • Person
  • 3-Mar-1847 to 2-Aug-1922

Alexander Graham Bell, teacher of the deaf, inventor, scientist (born 3 March 1847 in Edinburgh, Scotland; died 2 August 1922 near Baddeck, NS). Alexander Graham Bell is generally considered second only to Thomas Alva Edison among 19th- and 20th-century inventors. Although he is best known as the inventor of the first practical telephone, he also did innovative work in other fields, including aeronautics, hydrofoils and wireless communication (the “photophone”). Moreover, Bell himself considered his work with the deaf to be his most important contribution. Born in Scotland, he emigrated to Canada in 1870 with his parents. Bell married American Mabel Hubbard in 1877 and became a naturalized American citizen in 1882. From the mid-1880s, he and his family spent their summers near Baddeck on Cape Breton Island, where they built a large home, Beinn Bhreagh. From then on, Bell divided his time and his research between the United States and Canada. He died and was buried at Baddeck in 1922.

Bell, Mabel Hubbard

  • Person
  • 25-Nov-1857 to 3-Jan-1923

Mabel Gardiner Hubbard Bell, aeronautics financier, community leader, social reformer and advocate for the deaf (born 25 November 1857 in Cambridge, Massachusetts; died 3 January 1923 in Chevy Chase, Maryland). Bell actively supported and contributed to the work of her husband, inventor Alexander Graham Bell. Her financial investment in his work made her the first financier of the aviation industry in North America. She was a community leader in Baddeck, Nova Scotia, where the Bell family spent their summers. She was also a social reformer and supported innovation in education.

Brown Family

  • Family

Richard Henry Brown was born 13 November 1837 at London, England, the son of Richard and Sibella Margaret (Barrington) Brown. R.H. married Barbara Davison (1842-1898) on 23 November 1864 and the couple had five children: Margaret Sibella, Elizabeth Purves, Anne Ethel, Richard Charles, and Lillian Seward. The family resided in Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia where Brown worked as manger of the General Mining Association (later the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company), and served as the mayor of the town of Sydney Mines. Daughter Margaret (1866-1961) became an artist and served on the directorate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. Richard Charles (1872-1928) studied engineering and worked with his father at the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company.

Brown, Barbara

  • Person
  • 1842-1898

Barbara Davison married Richard Henry Brown on the 23 of November, 1864. She had five children, Margaret Sibella, Elizabeth Purves, Anne Ethel, Richard Charles, and Lillian Seward.

Brown, Elizabeth Purves

  • Person

Elizabeth Purves Brown was the daughter of Richard Henry Brown and Barbara (Davison) Brown.

Brown, Lillian Seward

  • Person

Lillian Seward Brown was the daughter of Richard Henry Brown and Barbara (Davison) Brown.

Brown, Margaret Sibella

  • Person
  • 1866-1961

Margaret Sibella was the daughter of Richard Henry Brown and Barbara (Davison) Brown. Margaret became an artist and served on the directorate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

Brown, Richard Charles

  • Person
  • 1872-1928

Richard Charles Brown was the son of Richard Henry Brown and Barbara (Davison) Brown. Richard studied engineering and worked with his father at the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company.

Brown, Richard Henry

  • Person
  • 1837-1920

Richard Henry Brown was born 13 November 1837 at London, England, the son of Richard and Sibella Margaret (Barrington) Brown. Brown married Barbara Davison (1842-1898) on 23 November 1864 and the couple had five children: Margaret Sibella, Elizabeth Purves, Anne Ethel, Richard Charles, and Lillian Seward. The family resided in Sydney Mines, Nova Scotia where Brown worked as manger of the General Mining Association (later the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company), and served as the mayor of the town of Sydney Mines. Daughter Margaret (1866-1961) became an artist and served on the directorate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. Richard Charles (1872-1928) studied engineering and worked with his father at the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company.

Johnstone, Anne Ethel

  • Person

Anne Ethel (Brown) Johnstone was the daughter of Richard Henry Brown and Barbara (Davison) Brown. She was married to Dr. L.W. Johnstone.

Parris, Eddie

  • 10-Jul-1942 to 31-Mar-2018

Eddie Parris was a former Alderman for Sydney, Nova Scotia.

Plant, Samuel

  • Person

Samuel Plant was a United Empire Loyalist who came from New York after the close of the American Revolution. He started a business which became one of the most prosperous mercantile ventures on the island. The Plant family's stone house in North Sydney remained in the family until 1937.

Sydney Millionaires

  • Corporate body

The Sydney Millionaires challenged the Quebec Bulldogs for the Stanley Cup for the first and only time in 1913, under the leadership of Captain Alfred "Cap" McDonald. In 1922, the team name was resurrected under a new senior team, which would go on to play for two Allan Cup national titles. In 1949, the name was also used for a junior team, which started up in 1949.

The Gaelic College

  • Corporate body
  • 1938-

"The Gaelic College was founded in St. Ann’s, Nova Scotia, in 1938, by people from the local community who wanted to create a memorial for the Gaelic speaking pioneers of Cape Breton. Efforts were spearheaded by Angus William Rugg MacKenzie, the minister at the Knox Presbyterian Church in nearby Baddeck. That year, the Cape Breton Island Gaelic Foundation began the work of raising funds to establish the Gaelic College. A committee toured the United States and Canada, raising money through $5 subscriptions. The first building at the site on the Bay of St. Ann’s was a log cabin raised in 1939. Classes in the early years included Gaelic language, Gaelic grammar, Gaelic song, bagpiping, the history of the Gaelic in Scotland, in Nova Scotia and in the rest of North America, as well as social economics. Classes in weaving, folklore and highland dancing were soon added. From its humble beginnings, this unique institution has expanded and gained an international reputation for its contribution to the maintenance and preservation of the language and culture."