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MacKenzie, Hugh Francis Songs - Gaelic
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Early Days in Washabuck

Item is an audio recording of Hugh F. Mackenzie, Alex Maclean, and Joseph A. Gillis discussing the early days of Washabuck N.S.

Drowning of Peter MacLean in 1827. (Alex MacLean) (Story--Ghost)
"Mr. MacLean, tell us about the early days of your ancestors in this country." (Hugh MacKenzie) (History)
Washabuck ghost story - same as earlier but more detailed. (Alex MacLean)
"I was told a story about a boat built in Washabuck..."(1868) The boat sailed from Baddeck, 1868, and disappeared-the "Alexander" (Alex MacLean)
Hugh F. MacKenzie recites poetry - lament composed for the crew of the above mentioned schooner.
"Cornmeal and molasses" - story referring to Scottish immigration. (Alex MacLean)

Song - "Thainig mi...gu ann taigh Gilleasbuig Ruaraidh..." Eadar bha ho-annan (Unidentified singers)
Song - "Hinn ho hog a ro..." (Unidentified singers)

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Gaelic Recitation of Prayers

Hugh MacKenzie, Archie A. MacKenzie, Joseph A. Gillis, Sister Jane MacKenzie, Margaret MacKenzie recite the Rosary.

Although there was no practice for this, it was very piously recited.

Litany and Acts by the same people as above. It was good to hear the prayers in Gaelic!

Sister Jane Mackenzie speaks. "Recording of the Rosary was made possible by the courtesy of Mr.Joe Gillis, Sydney, and was recited at the home of Archie Mackenzie.

Meditations by Hugh MacKenzie (Gaelic)

Night prayers by Anthony MacKenzie of East Bay. Calls upon God's mercy and protection for the family.
If anyone should die they should wake in the arms of God.

Next prayer will be the Acts (Humility, etc.) in Gaelic by Hugh MacKenzie.

Hugh MacKenzie, Anthony MacKenzie, and Joe Gillis recite the Our Father, Hail Mary, and the Creed.

Hugh MacKenzie tells us: "You had no book, Anthony." No, he didn't - prayers said were learned at his mother's knee.

Hugh MacKenzie tells us: "This is the prayer we recited when leaving the house at night."

Anthony MacKenzie recites prayer said before retiring at night.

Hugh MacKenzie recites prayer of thanks giving.

Anthony MacKenzie recites the Act of Contrition.

Hugh MacKenzie introduces Anthony Mackenzie who will sing a Gaelic song. "This song was composed by Mrs. MacKinnon of Big Pond because the people of that area missed Father Neil MacLeod after he had been sent to Rome."

Anthony MacKenzie sings (Religious song)

Anthony MacKenzie recited "Hymn to the Holy Ghost"

Hugh MacKenzie recites the Nicene Creed, Confiteor, and continued with the Prayer before the Crucifix.

Divine Praises: De Profundis (Hugh MacKenzie)

Litany of the Guardian Angels (Hugh MacKenzie)

Anthony MacKenzie sings a lament composed by Rev. Angus MacDoald's sister in Barra, Scotland in the latter part of the 18th century. She later married a MacKinnon and settled in Rear Christmas Island.

Hugh MacKenzie says the "Anthony MacKenzie is over 80 years of age and his memory is
remarkable...The lament he just sang was learned from his mother."

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Gaelic Recitation of Prayers

Hugh MacKenzie, Archie A. MacKenzie, Joseph A. Gillis, Sister Jane MacKenzie, Margaret MacKenzie recite the Rosary

Although there was no practice for this, it was very piously recited.

Litany and Acts by the same people as above. It was good to hear the prayers in Gaelic!

Sister Jane Mackenzie speaks. "Recording of the Rosary was made possible by the courtesy of Mr.Joe Gillis, Sydney, and was recited at the home of Archie Mackenzie.

Meditations by Hugh MacKenzie (Gaelic)

Night prayers by Anthony MacKenzie of East Bay. Calls upon God's mercy and protection for the family. If anyone should die they should wake in the arms of God.

Next prayer will be the Acts (Humility, etc.) in Gaelic by Hugh MacKenzie.

Hugh MacKenzie, Anthony MacKenzie, and Joe Gillis recite the Our Father, Hail Mary, and the Creed.

Hugh MacKenzie tells us: "You had no book, Anthony." No, he didn't - prayers said were learned at his mother's knee.

Hugh MacKenzie tells us: "This is the prayer we recited when leaving the house at night."

Anthony MacKenzie recites prayer said before retiring at night.

Hugh MacKenzie recites prayer of thanks giving.

Anthony MacKenzie recites the Act of Contrition.

Hugh MacKenzie introduces Anthony Mackenzie who will sing a Gaelic song. "This song was composed by Mrs. MacKinnon of Big Pond because the people of that area missed Father Neil MacLeod after he had been sent to Rome."

Anthony MacKenzie sings (Religious song)

Anthony MacKenzie recited "Hymn to the Holy Ghost"

Hugh MacKenzie recites the Nicene Creed, Confiteor, and continued with the Prayer before the Crucifix.

Divine Praises: De Profundis (Hugh MacKenzie)

Litany of the Guardian Angels (Hugh MacKenzie)

Anthony MacKenzie sings a lament composed by Rev. Angus MacDoald's sister in Barra, Scotland in the latter part of the 18th century. She later married a MacKinnon and settled in Rear Christmas Island.

Hugh MacKenzie says the "Anthony MacKenzie is over 80 years of age and his memory is remarkable...The lament he just sang was learned from his mother."

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Gaelic Songs and Folklore

Materials include:
Duan na Callaig (a New Year's Rhyme recited to gain admittance to a house)

Another New Year's Rhyme, "Dh'Fhalbh Iain Mór Spàgach"

A speech in Gaelic to be delivered upon the 100th birthday of Catherine MacLean (née Gillis) a native of Boularderie, at the time living in Boisdale.

A speech for the Nova Scotia and Canadian Board of Social Services honoring Sr. Jane MacKenzie of Christmas Island (Hugh Francis' aunt) and the Sisters of St. Martha, Antigonish.

Hugh Francis' original compositions:
“Gearrain a’Mhairt” (The Cow’s Complaint)
“Oran a’Bhata” (Cane Song).
“An Té a Chaill a Ghàidhlig” (The Woman Who Lost Her Gaelic) by The Bard MacDermaid.
“Oran Pheadair Chaimbeul” (Peter Campbell’s Son)
“Uan Beag Màiri” (Mary’s Little Lamb). Multiple copies.
“Eilean mo Ghaol” (Island of my Love).
“Oran a’Chùil” (Song of the Rear). Also known as “Bu Deònach Leam Tilleadh”.
“Oran Togail a’Bhuntata” (Song of the Potato Picking).
“Màiri Lurach” (Lovely Mary).
“Oran an Graf Zepplin” with photocopy.
“Oran na Mohawks”. Attributed to John “Iagain Iain Òig”. Typed by Joseph J. MacInnis from a version that appeared in the “Steel-Worker”.
“Oran Bal Chatriona” by Archie Sheumais MacKenzie. About a hay cutting frolic held at the author’s brother Hector’s farm.
“Oran Teagasg nan Sgoil” by Archie Sheumais MacKenzie. About teaching school on Eskasoni mountain.

Copies of other Gaelic Songs:
“Sine Chaluim Bhain”
“Caidil gu Lo”
“Annie Laurie” translated into Gaelic.
“Eilean Fraoich”
“Crooning Melody” also known as “Dean Cadalan Samhach” by John MacRae, an immigrant to North Carolina. Musical notation is included.

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Hugh Francis MacKenzie fonds

  • MG 6.23
  • Fonds
  • 1905-1986

Fonds consists of papers that include:

b. Two copies of the history of the first settlers in Iona including MacKenzie's version of the story of their first encounter with the Mi'Kmaq ; a story in English and set in Christmas Island. Many cultural practices are discussed ; a speech addressed to The Nova Scotia and Canadian Associations of Social workers ; two songs in English.

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Hugh MacKenzie - Gaelic Songs and Stories

Item is an audio recording of Hugh F. Mackenzie singing and telling stories including:

"Yellwo to you, my Mary"
"Mary's hat..."Sheepers"
"Ship in a storm"
"Go to mountain and born the horse"
"Mountain under his head"
"Not bad for a horse with no shoe on its last feet"
In Big Pond "Prayer against Buffalo Bill's Power"
Christmas Island (N.S.) "Story of Pancakes"
"Story of pan-cakes" continued
Prayer at wake by Little Mike
Don't say 'Thusa'
French man working with MacNeil, neither could speak English
Story about fish on the Banks
Come for the hungry, Mr. Frang
Cast all six widows to hell
No permission to go to wake
Wake at Grand Narrows.

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

MacTalla an Eilean/Island Echoes

  • MG 6.42
  • Fonds
  • 1971

Fonds consists of the script of the first ten programs of "Island Echoes", "MacTalla an Eilean" - 8 May 1971 - 10 July 1971. This program was hosted by Hugh MacKenzie on Radio Station C.B.I., Sydney and later by Norman MacLeod, following Hughie's death.

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis

Stories of Ghosts and Forerunners

Item is an audio recording of Hugh F. Mackenzie and Joseph A. Gillis discussing ghosts and forerunners in Gaelic tradition.

"Miracle of the seed." (Gillis, Joe)
Story about Frenchvale (Gillis, Joe) (Anecdote--Humorous)

Hugh MacKenzie:
"The barley is full of the devil, it will grow anyway." (Anecdote--Humorous)
Story of the woman who gave her cow to the Priest. One year later she came back for it.
"No liquor...Priest hated liquor so he sent the man out of his Parish."
Story about the man who saw his shadow. (Anecdote--Humorous)
"Did you hear that the devil died?" " "
Story about the farmer in Inverness. "I had lived here for 50 years and this road has never left here." (Anecdote--Humorous)
"He fell with a bottle in his back pocket." (Anecdote--Humorous) "I trust it was blood and nothing else."
"Mickey Katie saw something strange." (Story--second sight) "-- death of a brother."
Story about "the coffin being brought out to bury" that the man saw. He predicted that the coming death would be sudden. "It was." (Story--second sight)
"This man met a ghost." (Story--Forerunner) "The boy who died and returned with the money he had borrowed."
"Story about Ottawa Brook." (Story--Ghost) "...his daughter gave him signature he needed."
"Bocan......How do you know that this was a real bocan?" (Story--Bocan) Mr. MacKenzie and his brother were visiting a neighbour and saw a terrible thing at the end of the bridge. (Story--Ghost)
Story of the drowning and the fidelity of a dog. (Anecdote)
Story about the old woman who had no money. (Anecdote)
Story about the prayers. "Lack of intelligence makes people pray on, and on." (Anecdote)
"Here is the story about a foolish man who tells a priest about a bocan he saw." The priest told him it must have been the devil. "How could it have been the devil, it spoke Gaelic." (Anecdote)
Women who got lost (Finished on B-1)

Hugh MacKenzie:
What were you telling me about the bleating of lamb and the power of prayer? An old lady was lost in the woods. Prayers were said for her. A lamb was heard bleating. She was found.
"You won't go to their wake, they didn't come to ours."
"Thusa Eachain" (Anecdote--Humorous) "Don't call me 'Thusa' call me Sibhse."
It is true that there is gold buried in a well near Christmas Island? (Story--Ghost) People heard horses galloping - but there were no horses.
Story about the woman who had a great devotion to the Blessed Virgin - a priest played a trick on her. "Be polite, be quiet - I am talking to your mother!"
Story about the man who had no money - he walked 188 miles to get one bag of meal.
"She made him a pair of trousers and he went with her." Story about the woman whose husband wouldn't let her go away alone.
"She thought he was the Bishop" "Save me, save me, the Bishop is chasing me!" She thought her husband was the Bishop because he dressed up to go to church and she did not recgonize him. (Anecdote--Humorous)
"Horrinn o hi ri dhiu o." Mr. MacKenzie composed this in 1937, when he heard the whistle of the Steel Plant and thinking of his yesteryears he was lonely and sad. (Song)

MacKenzie, Hugh Francis